J-BRAAM

05/23/2013

16 Comments

 
Welcome to J-BRAAM, Jon's Big Ride Across America.

This will serve as my semi-daily accounting of the people, animals, traffic and things that I encounter on my bicycle tour from Oregon's Pacific Coast to Maine's Atlantic Coast. That's the plan, at least.
 


Comments

Doug
05/23/2013 2:46pm

North to south is shorter.

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Steve Roberts
05/23/2013 3:50pm

keep me posted. I'm so proud of you.

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Kathleen
05/23/2013 4:14pm

I'm so excited!

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05/23/2013 4:37pm

AWESOME! Can't wait for Jon vs. the road observations and insights. Will highlight you on TWJ, too! ;)

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Roger Leahey
05/24/2013 3:57am

I advise against this trip. If it were just Jon against the open road, I would be all for it. However, in reality, it is Jon against an army of people who drive drunk in a country where hit-and-run is now the norm, and where the economies of Mexico and South America are thriving on American drug use. And we live in a country rampant with crime. It is a completely unnecessary risk of life and limb. Jon, it would make a lot more sense if you rode around the local high school track 12,000 times. I have done dumb things myself, like riding alone halfway across Florida and back when I was Fellix's age. But this advise is pointless - after all, Jon thinks voting for Obama was a GREAT idea!

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Katy
05/25/2013 10:46am

As he has told you many times, he doesn't think voting for Obama was a great idea.

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Jamie Hennen
05/24/2013 5:17am

are you coming through KS?

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Jonathan Leahey
05/24/2013 3:17pm

Such a proud father!

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Roger
05/24/2013 7:10pm

Jon,
You may need this: HyperKewl Evaporative Cooling VELO Cycling Vest. I bought it for running when the weather is sunny and hot. You just drench it in water and wear it next to your skin. I bought the biggest size. You unzip it and it acts as an cooling air scoop. Google HyperKewl.

You may also need a "RainGutr" to keep sweat out of my eyes. They are designed for biking and running. Let me know if you need anything.

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Jonathan Leahey
05/24/2013 3:18pm

Sorry Jamie, I'll be staying North, hugging the Canadian border.

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Eric
05/29/2013 11:04am

Be careful getting to close to Canada. Like maple syrup, Canada's evil oozes over the United States.

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Eric
05/29/2013 11:08am

ERRR that should be too close to Canada. to, two, too. That's two too many spellings for the word to.

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Dad
06/01/2013 8:08am

Seeing that I am unable to talk you out of this dangerous undertaking, I leave you with this advise: You need more cowbell.

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Dad
06/01/2013 8:29am

Jon, I have a bad case of the following: I have started my Couvade Syndrome by vowing to jog 1,000 during your trip across America. I have 992 miles to go.
Couvade Syndrome
Definition
Couvade syndrome, which is also known as sympathetic pregnancy, male pregnancy experience, or "pregnant dad syndrome," refers to a condition in which a father-to-be experiences some of the physical symptoms of pregnancy prior to the baby s birth. The term couvade comes from the French verb couver, which means "to brood," in the sense of a bird protecting its eggs before they hatch.
Description
The term couvade was first used by the anthropologist E. B. Tylor in 1865 to describe certain father-hood rituals performed by husbands while their wives were giving birth. These rituals were found in many different historical periods as well as various cultures around the world, ranging from ancient Greece and parts of the Roman Empire to Chinese Turkestan, the Basque regions of northern Spain, China, Thailand, Borneo, parts of Russia, and many Indian tribes in North as well as South America. In some cultures the expectant father avoids eating certain foods or handling knives or other sharp tools while the mother is in labor. In Papua New Guinea the father builds a hut apart from the rest of the village and goes to bed when his wife s childbirth begins. He then stays in bed and imitates the pains of childbirth until the baby is born. A similar custom is observed among the Basques. Couvade rituals are thought to have a number of possible purposes, depending on the specific culture:
To draw the attention of evil spirits away from the mother to the father instead.
To strengthen the emotional bond between father and child.
To show that the man is the child's biological father.
To relieve the father's anxiety while the mother is in labor.
To strengthen the father's relationship with supernatural beings so that he can guide the child into the world.

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Jonathan Leahey
06/01/2013 9:29am

Dad,, now that's a swell post! Thanks. Keep me posted and much love.

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Dad
06/02/2013 10:41am

Jon, your blog is a trip!

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